World News

Iraqi Protesters Begin to Leave Green Zone After Storming Parliament Saturday


Haydar Hadi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(BAGHDAD) -- On Sunday, Iraqi activists called for an end to the sit-in of Baghdad's highly-fortified Green Zone over a loudspeaker, according to BBC.Tensions were high in Iraq the day before after anti-government protesters, chanting anti-government slogans and carrying Iraqi flags, climbed over blast walls surrounding the Green Zone for the first time ever.A state of emergency was declared Saturday when the supporters of influential Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr broke through the area, home to most ministries and foreign embassies including the U.S. embassy.In a television appearance, al-Sadr accused Iraqi politicians of blocking efforts for reform, many of which have been proposed by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi who took office in 2014.The protesters stormed Iraq's parliament after a parliament session was postponed because it failed to reach a quorum on Saturday. Al-Abadi was expected to introduce several new ministers who were non-partisan technocrats to help tackle corruption.Iraqi President Fuad Masum called on protesters to evacuate the building and said politicians needed to implement the new cabinet and fight corruption.As dusk fell Saturday, protesters set up camp outside parliament.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Mother, Daughter Lost in New Zealand Wilderness Were 'Scared to Death'


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) --  When Carolyn Lloyd and her daughter from North Carolina disappeared while hiking in New Zealand, Lloyd had to summon her survival instincts when her daughter started to "suffer and die slowly" during their days in the wilderness."She was fading on me," said Lloyd, 45. "As a mother, it's terrifying.""I took a tumble on the water and hit my head on the rock pretty bad," said her daughter, 22-year-old Rachel Lloyd.Rachel, who graduated from North Carolina State University in December, is in New Zealand studying at Massey University. Her mother was visiting. The duo intended to embark on a one-day hike on Tuesday but they got lost and stranded in a rugged area of Tararua Forest Park.The pair huddled together for warmth and rationed their supplies as they spent four nights in near freezing temperatures."I was speaking with my mom -- I was actually [sic] had to go through kind of my dying wishes which was the hardest thing -- watching my mom watch me suffer and die slowly," Rachel said. "My mom was incredible. She carried me on her back for a little while when she could.""I was scared to death," Carolyn said. "I thought they wouldn't find us."But they made two "help" signs and arrows pointing to their location, Jason Diedrichs, director and chief pilot with Amalgamated Helicopters, told ABC News. This photo of one of their "help" signs was first obtained by The New Zealand Herald.  The two were found Saturday and airlifted to a hospital, the New Zealand Herald reported.Diedrichs said Rachel was very weak and dehydrated as they had very little food over the course of the four days. But the mother and daughter are in good health, The New Zealand Herald reported.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Duchess of Cambridge Featured on Cover of British Vogue


Samir Hussein/WireImage via Getty Images(LONDON) --  The Duchess of Cambridge appears on the cover of British Vogue to celebrate the magazine's 100th anniversary, in a collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery of which Kate is the Charitable Patron.For the article, which appears in the issue that will hit the news stands June 5, the duchess was photographed by Josh Olins in casual attire to reflect her love of the countryside. She and Prince William have a country home Anmer Hall on the Sandringham estate in Norfolk where they split their time with Kensington Palace raising their children.The @NPGLondon has collaborated with @BritishVogue on a series of photographic portraits of The Duchess #Vogue100 pic.twitter.com/NCx9eKhyv9— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) April 30, 2016"Since 1916, Vogue has been a leading champion of British portraiture," a spokesperson for The Duchess of Cambridge said. "The Duchess was delighted to play a part in celebrating the centenary of an institution that has given a platform to some of the most renowned photographers in this country's history.""She is incredibly grateful to the team at Vogue and at the National Portrait Gallery for asking her to take part," Kensington Palace said in a statement. "She would like to thank Josh Olins for being such a pleasure to work with. The Duchess had never taken part in a photography shoot like this before. She hopes that people appreciate the portraits with the sense of relaxed fun with which they were taken."HRH was delighted to celebrate 100 years of @BritishVogue - a leading champion of British portraiture since 1916 pic.twitter.com/sJjCaghs2h— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) April 30, 2016On the British Vogue cover the coat and shirt are Burberry and the vintage hat is from Beyond Retro. The black and white head shot features coat and shirt by Burberry. In the color shot by the gate, the top is Petit Bateau and trousers are Burberry.Two of the photographs will be displayed in the "Vogue 100 A Century of Style" exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery and available to view Sunday May 1."To be able to publish a photographic shoot with HRH The Duchess of Cambridge has been one of my greatest ambitions for the magazine," British Vogue Editor-in-Chief Alexandra Shulman said.The images of The Duchess were shot by British photographer Josh Olins in the Norfolk countryside #Vogue100 pic.twitter.com/iz1rNSf1TH— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) April 30, 2016British Vogue scored a coup nearly every magazine editor had hoped for."I'm delighted the Duchess agreed to work with us and the National Portrait Gallery, and as a result of this unique collaboration we have a true celebration of our centenary as well as a fitting tribute to a young woman whose interest in both photography and the countryside is well known," she said.Kate has been the Patron of the National Portrait gallery since 2012 shortly after she married Prince William. The Duchess of Cambridge will view the photographs on Wednesday at the National Portrait Gallery."Josh has captured The Duchess exactly as she is -– full of life, with a great sense of humor, thoughtful and intelligent, and in fact, very beautiful," said Nicholas Cullinan, the director of the National Portrait Gallery."Not only do they reflect her love of the countryside, interest in photography and championing of the National Portrait Gallery as our very committed Patron, but they also encapsulate what Vogue has always done so brilliantly -– to pair the best photographers with the great personalities of the day, in order to reflect broader shifts in culture and society," Cullinan said. "We had fun in making and choosing these images, and I hope that comes across.”Catherine is a keen photographer herself and graduated with a degree in History of Art from St Andrews University, where she met and fell in love with William.She has taken several photographs of her children that have become iconic images of their life.Kate follows her late mother-in-law, Princess Diana, who appeared in the cover of Vogue four times during her life. Princess Diana was photographed twice by Patrick DeMarchelier and once by Lord Snowden. She was also honored posthumously after her death."It's a privilege to have been chosen to photograph HRH The Duchess of Cambridge for the Centenary issue of British Vogue and an honor that two of those portraits will hang in the National Portrait Gallery in London," Olins said."This was the Duchess's first sitting for a magazine and she was a joy to work with, a natural," he said. "I am incredibly grateful to Alexandra Shulman for placing her faith in me for such an important and historic assignment."Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. 

Rescuers Pull 72-Year-Old Man From Rubble 13 Days After Ecuador Earthquake


Embassy of Venezuela in Ecuador(NEW YORK) -- Nearly two weeks after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake struck Ecuador, killing at least 654 people, a Venezuelan rescue crew pulled a 72-year-old man from the rubble of a building.Manuel Vasquez was discovered by Venezuelan rescuers in the fishing town of Jaramijo on Friday while doing building inspections after they heard him making noises from underneath the the rubble of a partially collapsed building, according to a statement released Saturday by the Venezuelan embassy in Quito.Vasquez, who had been trapped in the building since the April 16 earthquake, was dehydrated and disoriented, and was suffering from kidney failure and a urinary tract infection. The embassy said he also lost several toes.He remains hospitalized.Ecuadorian Vice President Jorge Glas called the seismic event "the strongest quake we have faced in decades," adding it was the strongest quake registered in the country since 1979.The nation's armed forces and police were mobilized to keep public order, and Red Cross Ecuador had said more than 1,200 volunteers had taken part in rescue efforts, evacuation and first aid operations. Ecuador's Risk Management agency said 10,000 armed forces personnel were deployed to help people in the coastal areas.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kensington Palace Releases New Photos of Princess Charlotte in Honor of Her Firs


HRH The Duchess of Cambridge(LONDON) --  A series of photos of adorable Princess Charlotte, the second child of Prince William and Kate, were released by Kensington Palace Sunday, a day ahead of her first birthday.The four new photos were taken by HRH The Duchess of Cambridge in April at their home in Norfolk. The Duchess took these pictures of her daughter in April at their home in Norfolk. pic.twitter.com/dzPlj1snhN— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) May 1, 2016"The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge are delighted to be able to share four new photographs of Princess Charlotte," a Kensington Palace spokesman said in a statement. "The Duke and Duchess are very happy to be able to share these important family moments and hope that everyone enjoys these lovely photos as much as they do."Princess Charlotte is shown walking, or nearly walking, in a couple of the photos. The Duke and Duchess are happy to be able to share these family moments, ahead of their daughter's first birthday. pic.twitter.com/JziskTyCq4— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) May 1, 2016The Duke and Duchess released a similar photograph of their son Prince George when he was walking at the same age.Princess Kate reflected on her daughter just before the Queens 90th birthday in a documentary by ITN: "The Queen was really thrilled that it was a little girl, and I think as soon as we came back here to Kensington she was one of our first visitors here,” Duchess Kate said. "It's very special having a new little girl." The Duke and Duchess are delighted to share new photographs of Princess Charlotte. pic.twitter.com/Hvnk7FYEFC— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) May 1, 2016She added, "I feel very, very lucky that George has got a little sister."Prince William expressed his sentiments about his growing family shortly after Princess Charlotte's birth. “It has been fantastic and she has been a little joy of heaven," he said. "But at the same time, it is more responsibility, looking after two little ones, especially when George is around. He’s a little monkey." We hope that everyone enjoys these lovely photos as much as we do. pic.twitter.com/PqZnnQyX9h— Kensington Palace (@KensingtonRoyal) May 1, 2016Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

More Than 80 Refugees Missing After Boat Sinks Off Libyan Coast


iStock/Thinkstock(LAMPEDUSA, Italy) -- More than 80 refugees are feared missing after their boat sank off the coast of Libya.An Italian merchant ship was able to rescue 26 survivors after the Italian coast guard received a satellite phone call Friday. The inflatable dinghy was found taking on water in rough waves of up to 7 feet, according to BBC.The International Organization for Migration said testimonies gathered from asylum seekers indicated that 84 people were missing.A spokesperson for the Italian coast guard told BBC similar dinghies used were usually full, carrying 100-120 people.The rescued refugees were brought to Lampedusa, an Italian island south of Sicily, on Saturday.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Iraqi Protesters Storm Baghdad Parliament, State of Emergency Declared


Haydar Hadi/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images(BAGHDAD) -- Tensions were high in Iraq Saturday after anti-government protesters, chanting anti-government slogans and carrying Iraqi flags, climbed over blast walls surrounding Baghdad's highly-fortified Green Zone for the first time ever.A state of emergency was declared when the supporters of influential Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr broke through the area, home to most ministries and foreign embassies including the U.S. embassy.In a television appearance, al-Sadr accused Iraqi politicians of blocking efforts for reform, many of which have been proposed by Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi who took office in 2014.The protesters stormed Iraq's parliament after a parliament session was postponed because it failed to reach a quorum on Saturday. Al-Abadi was expected to introduce several new ministers who were non-partisan technocrats to help tackle corruption.Iraqi President Fuad Masum called on protesters to evacuate the building and said politicians needed to implement the new cabinet and fight corruption.According to BBC, protesters settled outside parliament as dusk fell Saturday.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Kenya Protests Poaching by Burning Pile of Ivory


TONY KARUMBA/AFP/Getty Images(NEW YORK) -- Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta has set fire to a huge stockpile of ivory in protest of poaching.The tusks of nearly 7,000 elephants are being burned  in Nairobi National Park.  They were taken from rhinos and elephants that were poached, as well as from those that died naturally, the government says. The ivory was collected from Kenya's parks and confiscated at its ports. Before igniting the first pyre, Kenyatta said the fire shows his country's commitment to saving Africa's elephants."The height of the pile of ivory before us marks the strength of our resolve," he said."No-one, and I repeat no-one, has any business in trading in ivory, for this trade means death of our elephants and death of our natural heritage."The burning comes after African leaders meeting in Kenya urged an end to illegal trade in ivory, according to BBC News.Some conservationists have expressed opposition to the ivory burn in Kenya, saying destroying so much of a rare commodity could increase its value and encourage more poaching, BBC News reports.ABC Breaking News | Latest News VideosCopyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

Missing North Carolina Mother and Daughter Hikers Found Safe in New Zealand Fore


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- A mother and daughter from North Carolina who went missing Tuesday while hiking in New Zealand have been found, local police said Saturday. MISSING HIKERS FOUND - Police confirm missing mother and daughter in Tararua Forest Park have been found safe. More soon— New Zealand Police (@nzpolice) April 30, 2016Carolyn Lloyd, 45, and her daughter Rachel Lloyd, 22, were spotted in Tararua Forest Park by a search helicopter Saturday morning. The pair, who huddled together for warmth and rationed their supplies, were airlifted to a hospital and are in good health, the New Zealand Herald reported.Rachel, who graduated from North Carolina State University in December, is in New Zealand studying at Massey University. Her mother was visiting.The mother-daughter duo, who hail from Charlotte, had intended to embark on a one-day hike, but they got lost and stranded in a rugged area of the park. The pair's rental car was found abandoned at the park two days after they failed to check-in to a hotel, according to ABC Charlotte affiliate WSOC. Dog teams, helicopters and four-wheel vehicles were used in the search.Sgt. Anthony Harmer of the New Zealand police told WSOC, "One thing about the New Zealand bush is it often takes people unaware. It’s a little bit steeper and little bit more rugged than a lot of tourists expect or plan for.”Rachel's father told WSOC he plans to travel to New Zealand this weekend.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.

What Puerto Rico Needs From Congress Ahead of May 1 Debt Deadline


iStock/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- Puerto Rico is facing its biggest debt deadline yet on May 1, but Congress, which experts say is the territory's only hope, likely won't be doing anything about it.“Congress holds keys to solving the situation," economist Aleksandar Tomic told ABC News about the territory's $73 billion debt crisis.On May 1, a $422 million payment is due to Puerto Rico's Government Development Bank, its biggest yet. Its upcoming deadline of $2 billion looms even more ominously. There is one immediate way that Congress could help, Tomic said, which is re-instating Chapter 9 bankruptcy protection afforded to mainland municipalities. That provision was stripped of Puerto Rico by Congress in 1984 and there is no real reason Congress could not re-instate it, according to Tomic."This would allow Puerto Rico to try and engage debt holders in restructuring efforts that might help avoid the dire economic consequences of full bankruptcy," said Tomic, Boston College's Woods College of Advancing Studies program director of Master of Science in Applied Economics.In June, the territory's governor declared that it could not pay its debts. Since then, there's been little done to help the territory's debt crisis, thought 3.5 million American citizens reside there. The unemployment rate in Puerto Rico is 11.8 percent, while its population has shrunk by more than 5 percent in the last decade. Meanwhile, the cost of living has skyrocketed as per capita income is as low $19,000 per year.The Puerto Rican debt is small enough that any default will not, in and of itself, create a significant economic event on the mainland, nor in the world financial system, Tomic said."However, it will be catastrophic for Puerto Rico, as island government might not be able to provide even the basic services," Tomic said. "The exodus of businesses and populations will continue, and the territory will fall deeper into a downward spiral of missing debt payments, shrinking economy, and exodus of an able-bodied and employable population."On Tuesday, Republican House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Congress won't be acting to push legislation to help Puerto Rico in time for the May 1 deadline.“Congress can, of course, bail out Puerto Rico, and for all the political grandstanding currently taking place, this option might become viable if the plight of Puerto Rico's population gains enough media attention," Tomic said.Beside Congress' inaction, Puerto Rico also faces legal battles between the bondholders and the territory's government, "but these are par for the course in any bankruptcy situation," Tomic said.McCarthy has said he isn't in favor of a bailout.A draft bill has been stuck with the House Natural Resources Committee, which would have put into place a restructuring of Puerto Rico's $70 billion debt had the scheduled committee action taken place on April 14.Copyright © 2016, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.